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Shackman, A. J., Fox, A. S., Oler, J. A., Shelton, S. E., Oakes, T. R., Davidson, R. J. & Kalin, N. H. (2017). Heightened extended amygdala metabolism following threat characterizes the early phenotypic risk to develop anxiety-related psychopathology. Molecular Psychiatry, 22, 724-32.

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Continue reading Shackman et al. (2017). Heightened extended amygdala metabolism following threat characterizes the early phenotypic risk to develop anxiety-related psychopathology. Molecular Psychiatry

Shackman, A. J. & Fox, A. S. (in press). Afterword: What are the dimensions and bases for lasting individual differences in emotion? In Fox, A. S., Lapate, R. C., Shackman, A. J. & Davidson, R. J. (Eds.). The nature of emotion: Fundamental questions (2nd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

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NIMH-Funded Postdoctoral Position in Affective and Translational Neuroscience

Candidates are being considered for a NIMH-funded postdoctoral position in the laboratory of Dr. Alex Shackman in the Department of Psychology at the University of Maryland at College Park (http://shackmanlab.org/). The overarching mission of the lab is to have a deep impact on the fields of affective and translational neuroscience. To that end, we do our best to perform innovative studies that can lead to significant discoveries, to disseminate our discoveries as widely as possible, and to mentor trainees to become top-notch scientists. As part of a recently awarded R01 (MH107444), the major focus of this position will be on understanding the neural circuitry underlying fear and anxiety and its role in the development of anxiety disorders, depression, and substance abuse in young adults. A secondary focus will be on linking variation in the function of that circuitry to thoughts, feelings, and behavior in the real-world, indexed using ecological momentary assessment (EMA) techniques. Eye-tracking measures of attention and peripheral physiological measures of arousal will also be incorporated. There will be opportunities to become involved in other projects and to develop new analytic strategies. We are particularly excited about candidates with a strong background in fMRI methods, but will also consider those with expertise in other areas of affective neuroscience or clinical psychology. Applicants should have a Ph.D. in a relevant field; strong publication record; expertise in human cognitive, affective, or clinical/translational neuroscience; and excellent organizational and interpersonal skills. This is an excellent opportunity for receiving top-notch mentorship in affective/translational neuroscience in a highly productive environment. This is a 1 year position that is renewable for a total of 3 years, contingent on performance and funding. Applicants should send a cover letter describing relevant experience and interests, CV, and contact information for 3 references to Dr. Shackman (shackman@umd.edu). Applicants will be considered until the position is filled. The University of Maryland is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative-Action Employer.

Read more about the project here and here.

 

Shackman, A. J. & Lapate, R. C. (in press). Afterword: How do emotion and cognition interact? In Fox, A. S., Lapate, R. C., Shackman, A. J. & Davidson, R. J. (Eds.). The nature of emotion. Fundamental questions (2nd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

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Lapate, R. C. & Shackman, A. J. (in press). Afterword: What is an emotion? In Fox, A. S., Lapate, R. C., Shackman, A. J. & Davidson, R. J. (Eds.). The nature of emotion: Fundamental questions (2nd edition). New York: Oxford University Press.

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Shackman lab is taking graduate students for Fall 2016

Dr. Shackman is currently accepting graduate school applications via the clinical area group in the Department of Psychology and the Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (NACS) graduate program. Graduate students will actively contribute to our overall lab mission to have a deep impact on the fields of affective and translational neuroscience. To that end, we do our best to perform innovative studies that can lead to important discoveries, to disseminate our discoveries as widely as possible, and to mentor trainees to become top-notch scientists. Most of our research is focused on identifying the mechanisms that link elevated levels of dispositional anxiety to the development of psychopathology, including the identification of novel brain-based biomarkers and transdiagnostic endophenotypes. Our lab is always looking for people who are smart, productive, sensible, passionate, rigorous, fearless in the face of set-backs, hardworking, blessed with a creative vision, and fun! The lab provides an excellent opportunity for receiving top-notch mentorship in affective/translational neuroscience. My goal is to ensure that trainees are happy and cultivate the range of skills necessary to secure post-doctoral positions in top-tier labs.

For more information, please visit:

Clinical Psychology: http://marylandclinicalpsychology.tumblr.com/

NACS: http://www.nacs.umd.edu/landing/Students